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Difference between revisions of "Training 2015 - Practical Malware Analysis - Rapid Introduction"

Difference between revisions of "Training 2015 - Practical Malware Analysis - Rapid Introduction"

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=Trainer Biography=
 
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Andrew Honig is a software security engineer for Google and a tech lead on the cloud security team where he works on virtualization and kernel security. He spent eight years with the National Security Agency where he taught courses on software analysis, reverse engineering, and Windows system programming at the National Cryptologic School. He discovered several vulnerabilities in virtualization software including VM escapes in VMware and KVM. He's the co-author of "Practical Malware Analysis" and developer of the FakeNet malware analysis tool.
 
Andrew Honig is a software security engineer for Google and a tech lead on the cloud security team where he works on virtualization and kernel security. He spent eight years with the National Security Agency where he taught courses on software analysis, reverse engineering, and Windows system programming at the National Cryptologic School. He discovered several vulnerabilities in virtualization software including VM escapes in VMware and KVM. He's the co-author of "Practical Malware Analysis" and developer of the FakeNet malware analysis tool.
  

Latest revision as of 19:23, 25 April 2015

Practical Malware Analysis: Rapid Introduction

One of BruCONs most popular trainings is back in 2015. The co-author of the book (Andrew Honig) will be hosting one of our most popular training tracks. Don't be surprised if you are offered a complimentary beer at the end of each training day.

Students also get a free copy of Practical Malware Analysis: The Hands-On Guide to Dissecting Malicious Software

Course Description

Get a rapid introduction to Malware Analysis and Reverse Engineering from the guy who wrote the book. This crash course will train students on how to triage and analyze malicious software. Students will get hands-on experience in the art of dissecting malicious code and gain necessary skills in order to perform analysis in the field. This class prepares you for the Advanced Malware Analysis training that will be offered this Fall at Brucon.

Students will learn how to:

  • Get hands on experience analyzing backdoors, downloaders, keyloggers and spyware
  • Use key analysis tools like IDA Pro and OllyDbg
  • Analyze stealthy malware that hides its execution
  • Develop a methodology for unpacking malware and deal with the most popular packers
  • Quickly extract network signature and host-based indicators to locate and defeat malicious software
  • Apply new found knowledge of Windows Internals for malware analysis
  • Set up a safe virtual environment to analyze malware in a lab environment

Course Contents

Day 1

  • Malware Analysis overview
  • Setting up a safe environment
  • Basic static and dynamic techniques
  • Quickly obtaining signatures and indicators
  • A crash course in x86 Disassembly

Day 2

  • Using IDA Pro for reversing malware
  • Analyzing malicious Windows programs
  • Debugging malware

Day 3

  • Covert Malware Launching
  • Packers and Unpacking
  • Additional Special Topic as decided by the class

Prerequisites

  • Eagerness to learn by getting hands-on
  • Knowledge of operating systems and computer architectures
  • Basic computer programming skills with any language
  • Windows Internals knowledge is helpful but not required

Software and hardware requirements

VMware Workstation or Fusion installed. VMware Player is acceptable for this class, but generally not recommended. Roughly 30GB of free hard drive space for tools and the VMware image.

Trainer Biography

Andrew.Honig.jpg

Andrew Honig is a software security engineer for Google and a tech lead on the cloud security team where he works on virtualization and kernel security. He spent eight years with the National Security Agency where he taught courses on software analysis, reverse engineering, and Windows system programming at the National Cryptologic School. He discovered several vulnerabilities in virtualization software including VM escapes in VMware and KVM. He's the co-author of "Practical Malware Analysis" and developer of the FakeNet malware analysis tool.

Links:


Mon. 5 - 7 October 2015 (09:00 - 17:00)

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